All my rough sketches, concept stuff (as well as some properly completed art) and writing will be posted here, plus fandom geekery :) To find my art, just go to my art tag and for my writing, go to my writing tag.

You can also find me at DeviantArt, Facebook and Pinterest. I also sometimes post fan art of fanfics on ArchiveofOurOwn


Photoset

Apr 13, 2014
@ 7:39 pm
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21,484 notes

xfreischutz:

I was going to review my french and linguistics but then this happened instead.
Except it’s 3.30am so it’s half-assed. //shotdead

But hopefully people will find this of use. \o/ Sorry this took so long, Anon, and I hope it answers your questions.

(via skyshells)


Photoset

Apr 13, 2014
@ 7:33 pm
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91,840 notes

ivanebeoulve:

adventuresintimeandspace:

Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

yeah, for writting..

(via skyshells)


Text

Apr 12, 2014
@ 12:45 am
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13 notes

Anonymous asked: Pripyat's listed as a Transcended City (Those that guard). Are you sure that wasn't a typo? Seeing what happened to her, seeing her broken and still in pain and abandoned by her surviving children and practically bugnuts by the time Ys finds her... just... how? /Why?/

thecitysmith:

love can be monstrous though.

people forget that it’s a force, like gravity. hurtling downwards. i know I usually focus on the lighter, prettier side of love: romance and sex and pretty girls doing pretty things to each other but. love isn’t reserved for that. love stays, even when you’re broken and abandoned and damaged beyond repair, it can be toxic and tough, like exposed sinew, like a choke.

Pripyat, I think, has more right to talk about love than anyone each. She can measure it out in inches, in exposure, in shedding hair, with broken, nailess fingers. It’s who she called first to tell them to run. It’s who called her. It’s the image of her, going to that burning, bleeding place, to try and seal doors to stop more leaking out and feeling her skin slowly retreat. seeing what happened to Chernobyl- the noises. And how Pripyat didn’t leave her sister’s side. 

You think someone like that can’t know about love? She knows more than anyone else. Yes, she knows the size and scope of humanity’s crimes. And suffers pain for it every day, will suffer it for thousands of years to come. But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t love. Fear is often of the unknown after all. So she loves still.

What’s the phrase? From Katie Ford: ‘Don’t say it’s the beautiful I praise. I praise the human, gutted and rising.’


Photoset

Apr 12, 2014
@ 12:34 am
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182,130 notes

policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out that tell a different story

Follow policymic

(via skyshells)


Photoset

Apr 10, 2014
@ 12:15 am
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These are all of the character animations I’ve done for my uni’s game design project (as well as the stills for the three prisoner NPCs at the bottom). This is my first time animating anything properly, and due to time constraints I’ve had to simplify Kethva (cyborg-lady’s) design quite a bit. For a first go, though, I think I’ve done okay XD Although my favourite part was the concept art stage - designing everything - since that’s what I want to do most of all, rather than animate, I loved designing the different aliens and Kethva’s cyborg bodies, even if they didn’t make it into the final design.


Video

Apr 8, 2014
@ 8:54 pm
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7,525 notes

quoms:

cupiscent:

petermorwood:

ancientpanoply:

A video made for the Museum of Cluny, and its “The Sword: Uses, Myths and Symbols” exhibit. It tries to dispel some of the beliefs that are still prevalent today about the weight and mobility of fighters in plate armor and show some of the techniques used in combat against armored opponents

I’m always pleased to see videos like this. It’s as if people won’t believe unless they’re shown (and there are always some who go “ah, yes, well, in aluminium stage armour it’s easy.”)

Well, the Museum Cluny video, like the Royal Armoury demo team, uses real steel armour: those two pictures at the start show the originals; the video uses reproductions because no curator will let someone take two exhibits from his museum and roll them around on flagstones. Mike Loades in the UK has been doing similar armour demonstrations for years, as has Tobias Capwell of the Wallace Collection. Eventually the old “clunky, immobile, in with a wrench, out with a can-opener” image of plate armour will go away – but I won’t hold my breath. (That shade of purple isn’t a good complexion anyway…)

Even the faster demonstrations of these combat techniques are still dialled back to about half speed. Try to visualise how much quicker and more brutal this would be if the two fighters meant business, when the first rule was Do It To Him As Quickly As Possible Before He Does It To You.

Writer and swordsman Guy Windsor writes about doing motion-capture work for a computer game; his completely authentic techniques couldn’t be used because they were so small, fast and economical. The game needed big swashing movements because the real thing looked unrealistic, too insignificant to be effective…

You won’t see a “killing fight” (full speed, full power, full intent) recreated very often, either on documentaries or in museum exhibitions, because it’s very, very dangerous for (when you think about it) obvious reasons. These techniques from 600-year-old fight manuals were how men in armour maimed and killed other men in armour - and since they’re the original material, not a re-interpretation after 600 years of being diluted down to sport-safe levels, the techniques will still maim and kill men in armour. Even a blunt “safe” sword is pointed enough (first demo on the video, 1:54-59) to go into a helmet’s eye-slot and through the skull inside…

But if you’re lucky enough to see a full-speed demo between fighters in real armour using wasters (wooden practice swords), be prepared to pick your jaw up from the floor. It is awesome. And also as scary as hell.

Comments on comments:

"Pretty much proof positive that the people who claim that skimpy female fantasy armor is for increased maneuverability don’t know what they’re talking about."

They know exactly what they’re talking about. They want to see T&A on fantasy game and book covers, and since they don’t have the balls to be honest about it, this is their excuse.

It amazes me that the old saws about Western armour and techniques are still going about, because surely two minutes’ thought would let you know that of course knights had to be able to get up off the ground…  Europeans were wearing armour for centuries, why wouldn’t they develop techniques of fighting in it?

It’s easier to laugh (do the same people laugh about samurai?) and repeat what “everyone knows about armour" than it is to waste that two minutes thought. Thinking might reveal something to mess with set opinions, and that would be annoying…

Biggest pet peeve: People commenting on the weight and shape of armour restricting mobility…

As before - “everybody knows" that European armour is massive and clunky because that’s what "everybody knows.” God forbid they should ever apply the “if it was so useless then why was it used" logic to anything. Because then they might realise that what "everybody knows" is wrong.

I’m going off to (not) hold my breath for a while… :-P

I saw this video in the fascinating special exhibit at Cluny last time we were in Paris. So pleased to be able to have it on tap, because it was most excellent.

image

(via skyshells)


Link

Apr 8, 2014
@ 12:24 am
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28 notes

http://inksplattersandearlyhours.tumblr.com/post/81956554985/the-devil-is-a-loser-and-evil-is-boring-there »

inksplattersandearlyhours:

The devil is a loser.

And evil is boring. There are only so many things a selfish person could want; they don’t even reach for the highest point because they are fearful; that’s why they demand things instead of asking with open, vulnerable palms.

They are whiny, annoying creatures, demons. They…


Quote

Apr 5, 2014
@ 1:40 am
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101,979 notes

A writer is a world trapped in a person.

Victor Hugo (via post-traumatic-apathy)

Love this quote, but why just one?

(Source: maxkirin, via thelastdogfighter)


Photoset

Apr 3, 2014
@ 1:04 am
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8,462 notes

steampunktendencies:

Headdress & Winged Harness designed and made by Rob Goodwin

Costume Design: David Bamber

Photographer: Diego Indraccolo

Ballerina: Ksenia Ovsyanick

FacebookGoogle + | Twitter

Steampunk Tendencies Official Group

HOLY FUCKING SHIT THIS IS AMAZING

(Source: robgoodwin.co.uk, via inksplattersandearlyhours)


Photo

Apr 2, 2014
@ 1:59 am
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Running animation cycle for the protagonist of the game design project, Kethva. Just need to colour it.

Running animation cycle for the protagonist of the game design project, Kethva. Just need to colour it.